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Would You Rather: Doing Chores

Since we were children growing up, we could never avoid them – chores! Even if we’re no longer forced to do them, the reality is that the daily household tasks are still there, they still need to be done, and they are still annoying to do. Since some are even more menacing than others, we’ll still do whatever we can to avoid doing these tasks. Let us ponder exactly how far we would or wouldn’t go when it comes to doing chores.

  •  You have an eightpage essay to write for history. It’s due in the morning, which means you only have the night to do it; the teacher won’t take it once... read more
Would You Rather: Sharing

Willingness to share is a virtue most of our parents have tried to instill in us. However that doesn’t mean it come easily. When it comes to food, gadgets, clothes and even space, some of us find it extremely hard to divide our valuables among others. The Would You Rather scenarios might help us gauge the extent to which we hold the virtue of sharing.

In an effort to teach you the value of money you parents have decided to reduce your weekly allowance of $500 by forcing you to split it equally with your little sister. This means you would only have $250 to spend per week aside from... read more

Countdown: Top 7 Stereotypes Foreigners Have About Jamaicans

Just as each country is recognized by their outstanding cultural traits, our island is known for our Reggae icon Bob Marley and our sprint stars like Usain Bolt. We’re also known for our warm, welcoming island and our culinary trademarks. However, what we may call a downside to these national characteristics is the stereotypes that seem to spring from them. Foreigners that have certain perceptions of our country that vary from relatively untrue to downright ludicrous. We’ve narrowed down 7 top stereotypes that foreigners hold about our country and its people:

7. Marijuana is as... read more

Supporting Champions Marvin Hall, founder of Halls of Learning.

Ricardo Brown, ninth-grade student at Holy Trinity High School, sought guidance for his football career from Marvin Hall, founder of Halls of Learning.

‘SUPPORTING A nation of champions’  is the theme that guided the recently  concluded Boys in Education Week  presented by the British Council. The week of  activities kicked off on Monday, April 30, and  ran through to Thursday, May 3. Among the  scheduled activities, the week featured an  empowering educator’s day, parents’ seminar, a  mentoring workshop, and a career day.    

Students from 20 schools across the island,  at different levels of their education, turned up  in their numbers to take advantage of all the  week had to offer. The event, proudly  supported by the Jamaica... read more

5  Books Every Teen Should Read 

We've often heard that these seven to eight years that we are teenagers will likely be the best of our lives. Many of us who are currently experiencing teenage life, however, may seriously disagree. Regardless of how we feel about it, though, we have to admit that our teenage years are definitely intriguing. During this period, we face the unpredictable storm that is high school, make great friends, change some friends, discover our interests and tangle with our parents, among a host of other crazy, distinctly teenage things. In the midst of such tumultuous yet exciting times, we tend to... read more

The right approach to  teachers: Would you rather

It's no question that teachers play an important role in our lives. As our formal educators, they are a huge part of what we learn, how we learn, and even how well we do at times. Whether we love them or dislike them, it is in our best interest to develop a good relationship with our teachers. In this edition of Would You Rather we've provided situations that highlight how we tend to approach our teachers.

You can't stand your mathematics teacher. He is extremely loud and rude, but he teaches well. You missed a month of school due to illness and you need extra lessons to catch up.... read more

Would You Rather: Asking for favours

For some, asking for favours is as much a Jamaican characteristic as sprinting or dancing. Whether it’s asking a random person for a loan or ‘begging a bly’ in traffic, Jamaicans have no qualms about requesting the generosity of others. Some think this has transformed into a culture of mendicancy, reflecting badly on our people. But regardless of whether it is viewed as begging or simply requesting, asking for a favour is a universal act. It doesn’t always have to be negative. There is no shame in asking when you are in need, but some of us want to be careful not to make a habit of it. We... read more

Children First’ Eyes Expansion After Anthony N Sabga Caribbean Award

Kingston, Jamaica –Thursday, April 5, 2018: Amid tepid conversations about education, teachers and schooling in Jamaica, Claudette Richardson-Pious always ensures she takes a Children First approach. The 2008 ANSA Caribbean Award for Excellence Laureate is the co-founder and executive director of Children First, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of Jamaica’s street children.

Richardson-Pious explains that it was through teaching that she developed the love for children. To contribute to their safety and development, and to actively help to... read more

Chelsea Wright and the Girls Who Know

To raise awareness about sexual and reproductive health issues that are often overlooked within our society is how eighteen year old Campionite, Chelsea Wright describes the movement, Girls Who Know.

“I’ve always been involved in youth advocacy but it was never my intention to start something of my own, I never saw myself doing that,” she told Youthlink.
She said she encountered a turning point when she came by an article in which the head of the Family Planning board of Jamaica expressed deep concern over a case that included a fifteen year old girl being raped by a pastor. ... read more

Would You Rather: Money and Morals

 Despite the similar sound the words share, money and moral often do not share the same value among individuals. It seems that one must always take precedence to the other. Money is commonly referenced as the “root of all evil”. Such a saying makes it easy to see why money so frequently causes us to compromise our moral beliefs. However it is just as easy to argue that the saying in no way provides justification for unscrupulous actions in the name of money. The following scenarios might help us decide how to better organize our sense of money and morals:
·         Your parents are... read more

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